“The Missouri Review is, quite simply, one of the best literary journals in the world." —Robert Olen Butler
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Poem of the Week- Ann Keniston: “Double Lake” →

This week we feature a new poem by Ann Keniston. Keniston is the author of the poetry collection, The Caution of Human Gestures, and a chapbook, November Wasps: Elegies, as well as coeditor of The New American Poetry of Engagement: A 21st Century Anthology. Her poems have appeared in Antioch Review, Interim, New Ohio Review, Southwest Review, and elsewhere. She is also a scholar of contemporary American poetry and associate professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno. She lives in Reno with her husband and two sons. 

What Happens When You Win Part III →

Not to alarm y’all or anything, but October 1st is almost ONE week away. Do yourself a favor and submit here.

What Happens When You Win...Part II →

Today we hear from Roy Kesey, 2008’s fiction winner; and Kai Carlson-Wee, 2013’s poetry winner. 

October 1st is a little less than two weeks away! GO GO GO GO 

LitMag Tuesday: The Missouri Review →

thebookmunkie:

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First published: 1978

Location: Columbia, Missouri, USA

Frequency: 4 issues a year, digital and print

Submission Focus: Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry

Submission Method: Email or physical Submission Guidelines

Active competition: Yes, closes on October 1st, 2014. Contest…

Thanks for the shout out!

Reminder that October 1st is not so far away! 

ICYMI: Literature on Lockdown →

In this week’s post, Eric Boyd reflects on the events that landed him in prison in addition to discussing the difficulties he faces in life after being released. 

theparisreview:

“In our own lives, how do we get ourselves to think about how we think and why we think it? And then, of course, that’s the place essays come from. And where all writing comes from.”
An interview with Lynne Tillman.

theparisreview:

“In our own lives, how do we get ourselves to think about how we think and why we think it? And then, of course, that’s the place essays come from. And where all writing comes from.”

An interview with Lynne Tillman.

What Happens When You Win Part I →

For the next few weeks, we will be featuring narrative accounts “from the horse’s mouth,” so to speak—former winners in essay, fiction, and poetry of our Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prize. All of our winners have different backgrounds, experiences, publication records, and responses to achieving this esteemed prize and honor. Today we hear from David Zoby, 2013’s essay winner; Fiona McFarlane, 2009’s fiction winner; and David Kirby, 2011’s poetry winner. 

20 DAYS UNTIL OCTOBER 1ST GET TO IT 

Poem of the Week- Eleanor Stanford: “Solitary Sandpiper (Totanus solitarius)” →

This week we’re delighted to offer a new poem by Eleanor Stanford. Stanford is the author of two books of poems The Book of Sleep and Bartram’s Garden (forthcoming), both from Carnegie Mellon University Press, and a memoir História, História: Two Years in the Cape Verde Islands (Chicago Center for Literature and Photography). Her poems and essays have appeared in Poetry, The Harvard Review, The Iowa Review, and many others. She lives in the Philadelphia area, and is a 2014-2015 Fulbright scholar to Brazil. 

nationalbook:

Today is UNESCO’s International Literacy Day, the perfect time to reflect on the importance of reading and access to literature.
According to UNESCO, “Literacy is at the heart of basic education for all, and essential for eradicating poverty, reducing child mortality, curbing population growth, achieving gender equality and ensuring sustainable development, peace and democracy.”
Looking for ways to show some love for literacy? You can celebrate the growth of BookUp, our after-school reading program, or offer praise for the incredible work of our Innovations in Reading Prize winners like Books on Bases (pictured), The Uni Project, Little Free Library, and Worldreader

nationalbook:

Today is UNESCO’s International Literacy Day, the perfect time to reflect on the importance of reading and access to literature.

According to UNESCO, “Literacy is at the heart of basic education for all, and essential for eradicating poverty, reducing child mortality, curbing population growth, achieving gender equality and ensuring sustainable development, peace and democracy.”

Looking for ways to show some love for literacy? You can celebrate the growth of BookUp, our after-school reading program, or offer praise for the incredible work of our Innovations in Reading Prize winners like Books on Bases (pictured), The Uni Project, Little Free Library, and Worldreader

(via powells)

On the Blog --> The Ten: The Books That Stay With Me (Or You) →

In the three weeks or so, there has been one of those tagging games on Facebook that have been ubiquitous since, oh, probably as soon as the site launched. Though one of my aunts used to send me emails that were very similar way back when all we had were AOL.com email addresses, so these “tagging” games have probably been around since humans learned to write. Anyway, the current one is to list the ten books that have “stayed with you” in your life. With one or two exceptions, most of these lists that I’ve seen on Facebook lack context. Why did these books stay with you? What does “stay with you” mean? Why are you imploring me to read them? 

Today on the TMR blog, managing editor Michael Nye lists ten novels that have stayed with him and hates on Tobias Wolff’s Old School

Hey! October is just around the corner and you know what that means? You still have time to enter The Missouri Review’s Editor’s Prize contest! 

Prizes offered include:

  • $5,000 in fiction
  • $5,000 in poetry 
  • $5,000 in essay

More information and full guidelines can be found here.

Submit today and hit your shmoney dance later. 

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We tell each other stories to help each other live. That’s why I read poetry. I read poetry to stay alive. That’s why I went to poetry in the first place, that’s why I stay with it, that’s why I’ll never leave it.

— Marie Howe, interviewed by Victoria Redel for BOMB Magazine (via bostonpoetryslam)

(via poetsandwriters)

Good plan. 

Good plan. 

(Source: asthmatickitty.com, via nevver)

17 Brilliant Short Novels You Can Read in a Sitting →

A great list via Electric Literature 

Literature on Lockdown: “Writing From Inside: Truth and Consequences” →

In this week’s post of our continuing series, writer Boston Woodard addresses corruption and misinformation within the California prison system.